Twin tiers baptist high school-

TTCA focuses on spiritual growth in addition to academics, athletics, and the fine arts. Soccer and Cross Country is underway. Inspiring students in a Christ centered, student focused, college oriented education. At TTCA we offer a variety of programs for all grades 5th through 12th. Hurray, time is short.

Twin tiers baptist high school

Wilson following our bptist for beyond high school in Bible class. They do not simply teach at the Twin tiers baptist high school of the classroom; they are role models to the students, and even act as second parents when students have a need for them. This, that, and the other thing Odd thoughts. When I announced my choice of Houghton College, a Wesleyan school, Twin tiers baptist high school of the teachers and staff raised questions, often sfhool, about the choice. Somehow our conversation intersected with that of some girls. I also remember winning the award, and Mrs.

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One other thing I remember from Twin tiers baptist high school 8th grade pictures is an incident from scyool club. Moving to College Place West The excitement and challenge of a new phase in our lives. Be Swift, Be Precise. Be Swift, Be Precise Let us run with patience the race that is set before us Mad Genius Club We're not really mad geniuses. Create a free website or Older lesbian suck nipple at WordPress. Population stats Twin tiers baptist high school from the United States Census Bureau. To my mind they were the usual kids scaring each other tactics. It was rough being in fifth grade. When I announced my choice of Houghton Shool, a Wesleyan school, several of the teachers and staff raised questions, often toers, about the choice. Snyder as my piano teacher. Brenda Wandell. Let me begin with a caveat.

One of the main focuses of the summer trip in was my 25th high school reunion.

  • TTCA focuses on spiritual growth in addition to academics, athletics, and the fine arts.
  • One of the main focuses of the summer trip in was my 25th high school reunion.
  • Finally, my reminisces bring me to my private school days.

One of the main focuses of the summer trip in was my 25th high school reunion. Today I post my final reflective blog on my school years leading up to that high school graduation — the senior year. The senior year book was dedicated in memory of Van Page.

His passing and his influence was still a constant reminder to us of the need to live Christ-centered lives now, even as we were planning for the future ahead — the fut ures that have unrolled before us in the 30 years since. The yearbook had other reflective moments.

There was a section of baby pictures, to see how various seniors had changed since their early days. I look at those pictures, compare to the senior pictures, and compare the senior pictures to my pictures today, and realize the continuity within change that the years bring. Do we find ourselves, become ourselves, grow into ourselves? Speaking of the senior pictures, my name was misspelled. My middle name got spelled wrong. My main role on the yearbook staff was advertising sales.

Among the sales was an ad from my then church honoring me as its graduate. I got to do the layout, and put it in a heavy old English font. With my experience as an editor and copy editor for both college and regular newspapers, I look back and that and wonder what I was thinking when I chose that font.

I remember Mr. Wilson following our choices for beyond high school in Bible class. As time went on we announced what college, or other endeavor, we planned to follow. When I announced my choice of Houghton College, a Wesleyan school, several of the teachers and staff raised questions, often indirectly, about the choice. The only person who expressed no doubt at all about my decision was Mr. The summer before ninth grade was one of the watersheds of our education. It was the summer that Van Page died.

From what I understood at the time, Van died in an attempt to help someone else. It may not have been a smart thing he tried to do, but the heart, the motive was right, what we all remember of him. I would appreciate those of you who did know him well to make comment after this column about him. This was the year I was on the varsity soccer team for the first time. We had been allowed to create special t-shirts for practice. I still have it in my drawer and wear it occasionally.

Our class count was up to 25 this year. I also notice on the faculty page of the yearbook they got Mr. Wyse and Mr. As I recall from our TTBHS years, 8th grade was always the year that the staff found the various classes the hardest to handle.

The 8th grade yearbook was dedicated to Mrs. I wrote a bit about her during my blog on 6th grade. But the significant thing was her teaching, both in piano and vocal, was the foundation of the musical skills I have used ever since.

There is a picture missing from our class pictures — Darla Kramer. Just shows you never can tell where you will find a connection. One other thing I remember from these 8th grade pictures is an incident from chess club. Then suddenly he declared it a draw. Seem he knew about this rule that it is a draw if you cannot checkmate the other person in a certain number of moves after he has only his king.

Our 7th grade yearbook was dedicated to Miss Oldroyd. It mentions that she had been at the school for 5 years. If my math is correct that means she started the same year the Lightfoots came to HCS. Miss Oldroyd is still there, and we might get a chance to see her and thank her during the reunion this summer, if we plan things right and invite her nicely.

Although I think the picture of me on the class picture page is just a closeup of the picture from the music page. Or if not a closeup of the same picture, a closeup from a picture taken about the same time at the same event. So our Sixth Grade year we were the top class, the graduating class. And the changes have continued over the years.

There are two events from the sixth grade year that I do remember. We were waiting around for our parents to arrive to pick us up. We had broken up into small groups, and were standing around talking. The groups were somewhat fluid, and I was talking in a small group of boys. Somehow our conversation intersected with that of some girls. I have remembered that encounter all these years — just not with a lot of details, obviously.

The second event I remember I know was specifically sixth grade. I was determined to win that award in Sixth Grade. I got myself up 15 minutes earlier every morning so I could practice 45 minutes a day instead of 30 to put the extra effort in. The annual recital that year was in the new church sanctuary.

I also remember winning the award, and Mrs. Snyder mentioning the effort I had put in, getting up early to rehearse. Obviously a lot of other significant things happened in sixth grade. My memory is notoriously sparse on those events. What do the rest of you HCSers remember from sixth grade? Now I arrive at fifth grade. As a fourth grader and third grader I heard stories about Mrs.

Harriman, the fifth grade teacher. She was tough. She was mean. It was rough being in fifth grade. To my mind they were the usual kids scaring each other tactics. Fifth Grade was one of my favorite years.

Harriman taught me how to study. Structure and discipline and focus emerged. But I also had a lot of fun. How many of you remember Mrs. Harriman reading us books over lunch time. There is one book in particular I have memories of — just not enough to figure out what book it was. The book was set in the Tudor or Elizabethan period of England, and featured a young boy and his mentor.

The scene I remember was the main character talking about the correct words to use for groups of various animals and people. Does anyone happen to know which book this might be? I also remember a field trip to the Newtown Battlefield. My mother was either the home room mother, or one of the ones assisting.

They drove us out in cars, and afterwards we were doing cleanup and packing up. I took the front passenger seat of our Mercedes D, and the other kids sat in back. Then suddenly I kicked my legs over and backwards and flipped myself into the back seat to sit with the two or three other boys from the class that was there. Does anyone remember that visit to the battlefield, or riding back from it, and that stunt of mine? I am sure it is true, but cannot remember who else was in the car.

The other scene from fifth grade I remember is actually from the yearbook. This was the year that the fifth grade was listed in the yearbook by book titles. Each of us, all 18, was given a book title. I have looked at those over the years and wondered how accurate each was. Were they at all predictive? And I think it has colored my perceptions since, such as meeting them on Facebook. But how much of that is my perception, and how much of it is current reality?

Which raises a question. Let me give credit and thank you to Kelly Margeson Sill for the photos with this blog.

I misplaced my fifth grade yearbook and she kindly scanned pages from hers that I could use to illustrate this blog.

Skip to content One of the main focuses of the summer trip in was my 25th high school reunion. What memories to you recall from senior year? I am amazed at the number of pictures of myself that I can find in the yearbooks.

It was also Mr. Among the sales was an ad from my then church honoring me as its graduate. Patrick Williamson. Search Classmates. But how much of that is my perception, and how much of it is current reality? Fifth Grade was one of my favorite years. One of the main focuses of the summer trip in was my 25th high school reunion.

Twin tiers baptist high school

Twin tiers baptist high school. Recent Posts

So perhaps now is a good time to do a series of blogs related to college, specifically my Houghton College experience, and related events. Let me begin with a caveat. Memory being memory, when faced with a hard fact something in print versus the narrative, narrative often wins. But I will at least, through many of the blogs, attempt to reference actual hard copy sources. But whether the anchor or the narrative reigns …. And those readers who shared some of the experiences, and might know, might still disagree on which side wins.

So with that introduction, I am going to start by trying to answer a pre-college question: Why I chose to go to Houghton College. Part of that question of course is why I chose to go to college at all. That goes to family history, and the high school I attended. I grew up in a farm family. But I know that education was important to them, and that their grandchildren went to college. Neither of my grandfathers went to college, to my knowledge.

My maternal grandfather was going to go on and be an engineer, but his elder brother died suddenly and he ended up taking over the farm. After she got out she met my father and married him. He graduated high school just before World War II and spent the war years either working on airplanes in plants in Buffalo, NY, or providing vital war efforts on the farm he took over from his father.

Now about high school. We obviously had the brains for college. Both of us earned Regents diplomas in New York in addition to local diplomas. So college was assumed. The question was where, what to study, and why. What was easy for me at the time: writing. Somewhere in high school I had gotten interested in writing I had always been interested in words , and at the time had a fiction idea and was going to write and publish a novel.

Why I wanted to go to college? I had no thoughts about studying something to make a career path to earn money at something. It was for the learning and education itself. But where? The limiting factor for me, at the start, was a private school, even a faith-based school.

My Grandmother Lightfoot asked me to consider another school that I had never heard of before. She had an article about it having just turned years old.

It was a very strong school academically, and she was very impressed with it. So I put down Houghton College. All three schools sent information, and I visited all three. All three had good cases, but only Houghton had an actual writing program, and even had a program where I could major in writing fiction.

I was impressed with the program, with the campus, the relaxed dress code and atmosphere was okay. I was impressed with the faculty, and the faith mission of the school. But it was sponsored by the Wesleyan Church.

When I announced my plans, as the other seniors were announcing, back at TTBHS, I got intent questions from people, many of them faculty, at the school. As Baptists, they wanted to know if I was sure about going to a Wesleyan school. Skip to content Finally, my reminisces bring me to my private school days.

It was also Mr. Robert had him in sixth grade. So education was important, but not the specific form of college. And thus the decision was made, and that is how and why I chose to attend Houghton College.

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TTCA focuses on spiritual growth in addition to academics, athletics, and the fine arts. Soccer and Cross Country is underway. Inspiring students in a Christ centered, student focused, college oriented education. At TTCA we offer a variety of programs for all grades 5th through 12th. Hurray, time is short. TTCA at a Glance. Mission Statement. Plan A Visit. Request Info. Apply NOW. Offering a Well Rounded Education. Spiritual Life. Fine Arts. Graduates have gone on to

Twin tiers baptist high school

Twin tiers baptist high school

Twin tiers baptist high school