Cannondale fatty shock rebuild-Head Shok and Lefty Information |

The Headshok suspension fork was first introduced in It features 4 strips of needle bearings. Each strip contains 22 bearings for a total of Together, with an aluminum outer tube and a steel or aluminum inner steerer tube, they form a telescoping assembly. With this design Cannondale has a system that rolls and does not slide like other suspension forks.

Cannondale fatty shock rebuild

Cannondale fatty shock rebuild

Cannondale fatty shock rebuild

A cautionary note though: I found the job to be pernickety in the sense you had to do some stuff in the right order, and it makes a difference if you do. So this means that however you disassemble or assemble the Cannondael, you should try to keep the same races in the same position and orientation. Sign in to add this video to a playlist. GCN Techviews. You have Plugged nipple opening when breastfeeding races four on the inner cylinder, four on the Cannondale fatty shock rebuild cylinder. Worldwide Cycleryviews. Each strip contains 22 bearings for a total of But I'm confident it's tight Cannondale fatty shock rebuild to not have this issue again, coupled with my new knowledge of the mechanical internals.

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I put this down to my liberal and very enthusiastic use of electrical tape to secure bearings and races, as well as a gentle squeeze on that inflated inner tube to help secure those top outer races. Question feed. One last thing I know I did do "incorrectly": you may pick up from the photos that the vent hole is positioned on the left hand side of the fork a product of my exploding inner tube in that I lost track of it's relative position -I believe it should it placed to the back of the fork. He is well known for wheel building, frame repairs, custom bike assemblies and tuning. This means that I put this fork back together the best way I could Cannondale diagrams notwithstanding using at best some guesswork and "common sense" "common sense" here is very subjective I know. Cannondale fatty shock rebuild can be a one person job. I've always been a bit pigheaded anyway -and like I said, I Cannondale fatty shock rebuild nothing to lose. On the downside -and rather worrying for anyone reading it -it does not include reassembly instructions, nor the disassembly of the bearings and races. To find out Cannondale fatty shock rebuild and where to send your repair or service item, click here. From what I read, getting an old ? So I'm looking at options and suggestions. If they are not identified on the diagrams by Cannondale, I'll do Sefora girl sex best to describe what I'm referring to. MCS also services disc brakes, suspension forks, rear suspension, XC Matue tit post gallery alpine skis etc. So Cannondale fatty shock rebuild you have it, caveat number 2: You mess with your Headshok at your own risk and this posting does not constitute in any way any endorsed ways of properly servicing or assembling or reassembling Headshoks.

I love my Cannondales.

  • If you have a hybrid Lefty fork or newer, characterized by the lack of a boot at the lower end the fork leg needs to be completely clean, smooth and free of any damage whatsoever.
  • The Headshok suspension fork was first introduced in
  • I have not worked on one of these forks.
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I love my Cannondales. I think they are the finest bikes on the planet, but boy oh boy do Headshok's have issues. They had them back when I was riding Caffeine's and they still haven't fixed them. When oh when Cannondale are you going to make these right? Step up to the plate and be the quality bicycle company you've been in the past. Put some engineers on re-designing this so it isn't a piece of crap. In my opinion, when working, no other shock comes close to being as good, but you're lucky if you get a year of riding out of one before it craps out.

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Let me try to do this as succinctly as possible: conceptually, you can think of the Fatty M as two cylinders, one inside the other. This assembly is pressed into the crown of a set of rigid aluminum fork blades. I ride the bike every day and the worn shock is not a deal breaker - but it sure is annoying. I can't stress this enough well, actually, that's not true, but it's the bloody easy way to do this, and you don't want the hard way. Email Required, but never shown. On the downside -and rather worrying for anyone reading it -it does not include reassembly instructions, nor the disassembly of the bearings and races.

Cannondale fatty shock rebuild

Cannondale fatty shock rebuild

Cannondale fatty shock rebuild. Location and Hours

If you have a hybrid Lefty fork or newer, characterized by the lack of a boot at the lower end the fork leg needs to be completely clean, smooth and free of any damage whatsoever.

If any of these conditions exist, the fork needs to go back to the factory for repair. Forks sent to Mendon Cyclesmith with damaged legs unfortunately will be sent back at the owner's expense. Fork Service Form. The Mendon Cyclesmith is not just a bike repair and retail shop but also your premier Lefty and HeadShock service facility.

Owner Craig Smith has over thirty years' experience as a cyclist, outdoorsman, mechanic and builder. MCS also services disc brakes, suspension forks, rear suspension, XC and alpine skis etc. The Headshok suspension fork was first introduced in It features 4 strips of needle bearings. Each strip contains 22 bearings for a total of Together, with an aluminum outer tube and a steel or aluminum inner steerer tube, they form a telescoping assembly. With this design Cannondale has a system that rolls and does not slide like other suspension forks.

Cannondale, Professional and Trusted Lefty and Head Shock Service Performed by Craig Smith

I have not worked on one of these forks. If you get in trouble, don't bother asking me for help, you're on your own! I'm posting it in hopes that it might be useful to some folks, but I can't give you any assurance of how the job will come out if you choose to attempt it It took me about hours in total to disassemble, reassemble, disassemble and reassemble again includes thorough degreasing and cleaning.

Admittedly, I do have some tools already, but everything else I needed I use in the general maintenance of bikes and is not Cannondale specific e. On the downside -and rather worrying for anyone reading it -it does not include reassembly instructions, nor the disassembly of the bearings and races.

Mical supplied this copy of the complete Cannondale Headshok service manual. Another side note here: find a clean box to put parts in. I wish I could practice what I'm preaching here, but alas, I can't tell you how many times I've put a part down, and the "Small Part Pixies" come out with their magic dust and thieving grubby little hands -spiriting the part away right from under my own eyes.

Putting the parts away safely makes it so much easier -I just really wish I could apply that myself! You should now have the fork in your hands with brakes removed or protected, right?

The next step is to secure the fork so that you can work on it easily -remember, I said there was only one of me and it can be a one person job:. It's at this point I can proudly proclaim this was an original idea of mine. So much of the stuff I've posted is purloined and gathered from other links, but this one is all my own, so I'm "dead proud" of this.

You can use the ends of the zip ties to jam down between the tops of the inner races and side of the tab on the race retention clip, forcing the race back and away from the race retention clip tab. If you do this with two adjacent races, you can then use the flat bladed screwdriver to push up the clip and remove it. Using this method, it took me all of five seconds to get the clip out.

A word of caution here: I'm guessing that if you break the retention clip, you could be in trouble, so be gentle. OK, back to my little cautionary disaster story: I had those three sets of parts described just as above.

I put down the outer steerer tube with inflated inner tube on my workbench to start degreasing and cleaning the bearings and inner races. Suddenly, there was a huge "POP!!!! My god, someone is shooting out the basement window! I said "Oh dear" and then added other far less than parsimonious words of the English language.

If you recall from my description, I had about 15cm of inner tube extending out of the steerer tube, and when I had pumped up the inner tube in my ardour to secure the races So here's my lesson learnt: use a lesser length of inner tube about 10cm , and have as little protruding out of the top as possible -this way, the inner tube should not burst.

Also, don't be over zealous with the inflation. So, my dilemma now was I'd royally screwed up the order of the outer races. How could I put them back together again in the right place and orientation? All I can say is that in the end, I tried looking at marks on the races and matching them up to marks in the steerer tube. Honestly, I'm really not too sure I put them back in the exact same place, but what I can say is that my Headshok is smoother now or is as smooth as the day I bought the bike.

I suppose the moral of the story is that even if you do lose the positioning of the races, don't give up, it's worth guessing and using a bit of detective work to hopefully reassemble them in the right way. And even if you don't put them back in the original places, it doesn't mean the Headshok won't work.

My experience with this: remarkably, my first re-assembly I did went like butter and I could not resist letting out a whoop of exhilaration and complete triumph. I had no problems at all, and in the end this process was mere seconds in doing. Still, even so, it only took minutes in total. I put this down to my liberal and very enthusiastic use of electrical tape to secure bearings and races, as well as a gentle squeeze on that inflated inner tube to help secure those top outer races.

Interesting Super Fatty M note here: this connection from the rod to the aluminium cap became loose on my fork when I originally got it. I believe it occurred when I was trying to preload the spring too much, and I think it effectively forced the rod to turn clockwise as I was looking down on it thus effectively unscrewing itself from this aluminum cap. Maybe I should have used thread lock on this, I'm not sure. But I'm confident it's tight enough to not have this issue again, coupled with my new knowledge of the mechanical internals.

I hope this post has helped. I wish it had been around before I started on my own Headshok servicing as and I think you can tell it was a learning experience for me as I went along. I've ridden the Jekyll since, and the fork feels fine, but of course, it may be I've done something terribly wrong -hopefully not -but would welcome any feedback or comments.

One last thing I know I did do "incorrectly": you may pick up from the photos that the vent hole is positioned on the left hand side of the fork a product of my exploding inner tube in that I lost track of it's relative position -I believe it should it placed to the back of the fork.

Since I tested it and it seemed to work i. I'm guessing it's OK and I can hear the air being forced out Accessories Bicycles Parts Specials Tools. It can be done. I did all work by myself with no help. It can be a one person job. It's not half as bad as people will lead you to believe, and the design of the fork holds no terrible secrets -conceptually it's actually pretty simple! A cautionary note though: I found the job to be pernickety in the sense you had to do some stuff in the right order, and it makes a difference if you do.

All I can say is that the order I've listed is the order I found that worked for me, and usually there's a method in the madness for a reason. Caveat number 1: Basically I had nothing to lose. If I screwed up this fork or couldn't get if back together, it didn't really matter, I'd just go ebaying and get a set of adaptor cups and a used fork also keep in mind I believe when you strip a Headshok, Cannondale may consider any warrantees null and void.

My primary objective was to disassemble the fork and put it back together. If I could do this, I'd then invest in the necessary Cannondale parts and fit them myself. I had nothing to lose but time here. This means that I put this fork back together the best way I could Cannondale diagrams notwithstanding using at best some guesswork and "common sense" "common sense" here is very subjective I know.

Let me reveal here I'm not a professional bike mechanic, nor am I a qualified mechanic in any area. I consider myself to be confident at mechanics The point here is that I'm just posting what I did -I am by no means suggesting this is the proper or appropriate way to safely reassemble a Headshok. So here you have it, caveat number 2: You mess with your Headshok at your own risk and this posting does not constitute in any way any endorsed ways of properly servicing or assembling or reassembling Headshoks.

I am also not responsible for your costs or damages incurred, personal injuries, first born child, blah blah blah. It's all your responsibility and I can't vouch for the accuracy of this post or be responsible for any mistakes contained within.

I did my work on a Super Fatty M. I have no idea about any other Headshok models, they may be totally different as far as I know. It came as standard on my model year Jekyll. OK, before I started this, I combed the internet looking for help. I googled, I yahooed, I did everything I could to search for any variation of the words "Cannondale Headshok Headshock assembly disassembly installation removal" etc.

Let me tell you: there isn't much out there. And what there is, is hardly encouraging. Certainly Cannondale provides no technical help in the sense of stripping down a Headshok -just rather weak technical diagrams and advice such as "service at an authorized dealer every 40 hours of use". Ooops, too late. I've always been a bit pigheaded anyway -and like I said, I had nothing to lose.

I talked with Eric -a very nice guy -so I'm giving Bikeway a plug here for good service. Thanks Eric! Just before I delve into my step by step on how I disassembled and reassembled, I want to add I will call parts by the names designated on the Cannondale technical diagrams.

If they are not identified on the diagrams by Cannondale, I'll do my best to describe what I'm referring to. It might be a good idea to have the Cannondale technical diagrams printed out in front of you. I did not find any left handed threads on any of the parts. Let me try to do this as succinctly as possible: conceptually, you can think of the Fatty M as two cylinders, one inside the other.

In between the two cylinders are four sets of long rectangular needle roller bearings set equidistantly along the circumference of inner cylinder and lengthwise down the cylinders.

These bearings allow the two cylinders to glide effortlessly between each other. Now, instead of these bearings hitting the metals sides of these cylinders directly, there are long metal strips races on each side of the needle roller bearings. You have 8 races four on the inner cylinder, four on the outer cylinder. So this means that however you disassemble or assemble the fork, you should try to keep the same races in the same position and orientation.

Please, please, remember this. This should be engrained in your brain when you are working on your Headshok. I can't stress this enough well, actually, that's not true, but it's the bloody easy way to do this, and you don't want the hard way. Of course if you screw this up like me Tweet Follow sheldonbrowncom.

Cannondale fatty shock rebuild

Cannondale fatty shock rebuild

Cannondale fatty shock rebuild